Gede Ruins

Gede Ruins

Gede Ruins – Not far from Malindi, in the splendid setting of the Arabuko Sokoke forest, rich in secular Baobabs, sequoia and quinine trees, stands Gede, an imposing 13th century Islamic city. The visit to the ruins of Gede allows you to admire what remains of it: the concentric walls defending the city, the great mosque, the rest of the water tanks and several buildings. The reasons for its abandonment in the 18th century are still unknown.

In any case, today we see a fascinating show, a ghost town rich in vegetation and populated by many monkeys that have chosen it as their home and will not hesitate to welcome you in exchange for a banana!

The ruins of Gedi are a historical and archaeological site near the Indian Ocean coast of eastern Kenya. The site is adjacent to the town of Gedi (also known as Gede) in the Kilifi District and within the Arabuko-Sokoke Forest.

Gedi is one of many medieval Swahili coastal settlements that stretch from Mogadishu, Somalia to the Zambezi River in Mozambique. There are 116 known Swahili sites stretching from southern Somalia to Vumba Kuu at the Kenya-Tanzania border.[3] Since the rediscovery of the Gedi ruins by colonialists in the 1920s, Gedi has been one of the most intensely excavated and studied of those sites, along with Shanga, Manda, Ungwana, Kilwa, and the Comoros.

The site of Gedi includes a walled town and its outlying area. All of the standing buildings at Gedi, which include mosques, a palace, and numerous houses, are made from stone, are one-story, and are distributed unevenly in the town. There are also large open areas in the settlement which contained earth and thatch houses. Stone “pillar tombs” are a distinctive type of Swahili Coast architecture found at Gedi as well.

Gedi’s location along the coast and association with similar sites along the Swahili Coast made it an important trade center. Although there are few historical documents specifically associating Gedi with Indian Ocean trade, the site is thought to have been one of the most important sites along the coast.[10] Gedi’s architecture and an abundance of imported material culture including pottery, beads, and coins provide evidence of the city’s rising prosperity over the course of its occupation from as early as the eleventh century to its abandonment in the early seventeenth century.

Book the Ruins of Gede excursion with us.

Duration:

Half Day

Services included:

Ask For Quotation

For more information on reservations or quotes you can contact us via WhatsApp + 254 748 755 706 or by email: info@kingliontoursandsafris.com

Ask For Quotation

For more information on reservations or quotes you can contact us via WhatsApp + 254 748 755 706 or by email: info@kingliontoursandsafris.com